Good Friday – Why is Good Friday Stated to as “Good”?

Good Friday is also well-known as “Holy Friday,” is the Friday directly preceding Easter Sunday. It is distinguished by tradition as the day on which Jesus was crucified.

Why is Good Friday stated to as “good”? What the Jewish authorities and Romans did to Jesus was definitely not good (see Matthew chapters 26-27). Nevertheless, the consequences of Christ’s death are very virtuous. Romans 5:8, “But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” First Peter 3:18 tells us, “For Christ died for sins once for all, the righteous for the unrighteous, to bring you to God. He was put to death in the body but made alive by the Spirit.”

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Several Christian churches rejoice Good Friday with a passive service, usually in the evening, in which Christ’s death is reminisced with solemn hymns, prayers of thanksgiving, a message centered on Christ sorrows for our sake, and adherence of the Lord’s Supper. Whether or not Christians decide on to “celebrate” Good Friday, the happenings of that day should be forever on our minds because the death of Christ on the cross is the top occasion of the Christian faith.

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Good Friday venerates Jesus’ crucifixion and death on the cross. Here are several fascinating facts and trivia associated to Good Friday:

1. Good Friday is a Catholic observance of Jesus’ passion, crucifixion and death on the cross.

Image2. Originally a day of fasting. Catholics now abstain from eating meat on this day.

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3. The procession from Gethsemane to the sanctuary of the cross started in Jerusalem in the 4th century. This was the basis of today’s 14 stations of the cross.

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4. Many countries with a Christian tradition make Good Friday an official non-working holiday.

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5. Catholics read the passion of Christ and practice the veneration of the cross.

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6. Some Christian countries ban consumption of alcohol during Good Friday.

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7. Germany bans public dancing on this day.

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8. In Bermuda, kites are flown to symbolize the cross and Jesus’ ascension into heaven.

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9. Liturgical color for Good Friday was formerly black, but it is now red.

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